Flipped teaching: narrow and wide definitions

Narrow Flipped teaching is sometimes presented narrowly, like this: Traditional = teacher spends class time lecturing, then students do exercises at home. Flipped = students watch video lectures at home, then do exercises in class. Wide You also see it presented more widely, like this: Traditional = teacher spends class time on content coverage, then students apply… Continue reading Flipped teaching: narrow and wide definitions

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Interacting with lectures and the best use of multiple choice

University lectures are often criticised for the passivity they encourage from students. One person talks for an hour; a couple ask questions; a hundred sit and listen. There are three contrasting responses to this: (a) It's the students' fault: if students take notes as they listen, the lecture hall goes from being a passive to an active environment. (b)… Continue reading Interacting with lectures and the best use of multiple choice

Is it a good idea to record lectures?

In his anti-lecture lecture, Donald Clark makes some well-known arguments about the weaknesses of the lecture format. They encourage passivity; they're too long; they're frequently delivered by introverts who have more expertise in research than spoken communication. It's an interesting talk, and I'd encourage you to have a listen. Here though, I'm going to focus on… Continue reading Is it a good idea to record lectures?